Karen Andes, author of  A Woman’s Book of Power, expresses that women who rediscover a lost passion in midlife perform what is known as Demeter’s Dance.

A piece by contemporary composer Mary Ann Tilford, entitled Eight Doodles for Two Horns, was featured in the 2010 Women in Music Festival sponsored by the Eastman School of Music. Tilford once again embraced the creative young girl that many women are forced to leave behind.

The following poem is a response to the playfulness of the piece, which represents the Persephone-self, as well as a celebration of Tilford’s renewal.

The pantoum form with its repeated lines has an incantatory quality.The subtitle,The Beltane Chant, alludes to the Celtic festival that takes place on May 1st.

Click on the following link to learn about “Bringing in the May.” http://www.circlesanctuary.org/pholidays/beltane.htm

The Horns that Herald Demeter’s Dance
(The Beltane Chant)

The horns that herald Demeter’s dance
bring forth harvests of harmonies
move to the center of the circle of life
heed the call of Persephone lost.

Bring forth harvests of harmonies
weave creations from the blue flame
heed the call of Persephone lost
take back incantations and spells.

Weave creations from the blue flame
up from the underworld timeless dancer
take back incantations and spells
transfiguration of the triune goddess.

Up from the underworld timeless dancer
maiden mother not yet crone
transfiguration of the triune goddess
fields of fierce power shadow to spotlight.

Maiden mother not yet crone
rest in the wilderness embrace the dark woods
fields of fierce power shadow to spotlight
spiral from winter into immortal grace.

Rest in the wilderness embrace the dark woods
move to the center of the circle of life
spiral from winter into immortal grace
the horns that herald Demeter’s dance.

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